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The Twilight Singers On World Cafe

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The Twilight Singers On World Cafe

The Twilight Singers On World Cafe

The Twilight Singers On World Cafe

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The Twilight Singers. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

The Twilight Singers.

Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "She Was Stolen"
  • "Blackbird and the Fox"
  • "Never Seen No Devil"

Web Extra

"Don't Call"

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In the alternative rock explosion of the 1990s, The Afghan Whigs gained a cult following for a unique approach that infused grunge and post-punk with a gritty, soul-bearing sensibility inspired by blues and R&B. When the Afghan Whigs split in 2001, lead singer and songwriter Greg Dulli's other band, The Twilight Singers, moved from a side project to a full-time commitment.

In The Twilight Singers, Dulli's sonic palette has grown even more eclectic, but his songwriting is as intense as ever. This year, the band released its sixth and latest album, Dynamite Steps, featuring guest appearances by Petra Haden, Joseph Arthur and Ani DiFranco.

In today's conversation, Dulli explains that although the recordings are new, some parts of the album have been with him for years.

"I had three titles that I came up with in the late '90s. I wrote them down and put them in a drawer and waited for them to be earned," he says, "I can't tell you what the other two are."

Hear more from Dulli and a live performance by The Twilight Singers on today's World Cafe.

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