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Baltimore's Mayor Inadvertently Wakes Up The City

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Baltimore's Mayor Inadvertently Wakes Up The City

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Baltimore's Mayor Inadvertently Wakes Up The City

Baltimore's Mayor Inadvertently Wakes Up The City

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Some Baltimore residents were getting robocalls from the mayor around 4 a.m. Saturday reminding them that Hurricane Irene was on the way. The city's automatic phone calls were supposed to stop by 9 p.m. Friday, but a glitch kept them going through the night.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

There's nothing like having your Saturday morning snooze ruined by the mayor. That's what happened to some Baltimore residents. Some homes were getting robocalls from the mayor around 4:00 in the morning reminding people that Hurricane Irene was on the way. The city's automatic phone calls were supposed to stop by 9:00 p.m. Friday, but a glitch kept them going all through the night. Officials say they'll try to keep late night warnings in the future to text messages and emails.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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