Playboy To Resurrect Its Famous Club In Chicago

Hugh Hefner and his bunnies made their mark 51 years ago with the first Playboy Club in Chicago. There are some Playboy Clubs now, but they are attached to hotels and casinos. The new site would be the first standalone club in decades.

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DAVID GREENE, host:

And there maybe some new jobs in Chicago - that is, if you don't mind wearing a cottontail and serving cocktails.

Our last word in business is return of the bunnies.

Playboy Enterprises plans to resurrect the Playboy Club in the city where Hugh Hefner and his bunnies first made their mark 51 years ago, that would be Chicago. There are some Playboy Clubs now, but they are attached to hotels and casinos. This would be the first stand-alone club in decades.

The Chicago Tribune says the company hopes to capitalize on the current appeal of early 1960s Americana as seen in the popular TV series "Mad Men" on cable channel AMC. NBC is also hoping to cash in on a new series this fall called "The Playboy Club."

And that wraps up the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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