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AT&T's Bid For T-Mobile Blocked By Lawsuit

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AT&T's Bid For T-Mobile Blocked By Lawsuit

Business

AT&T's Bid For T-Mobile Blocked By Lawsuit

AT&T's Bid For T-Mobile Blocked By Lawsuit

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140087399/140035350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Justice Department filed suit Wednesday to block AT&T's proposed takeover of T-Mobile. Officials say combining the country's second- and fourth-largest mobile phone carriers would be bad for competition. The $39 million deal has been under scrutiny from lawmakers and consumer groups. And the No. 3 carrier, Sprint Nextel, objects to the merger.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with the government hanging up on a big telephone merger.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Or maybe it was more of a dropped call. The Justice Department filed suit today to block AT&T's proposed takeover of T-Mobile. Officials say combining the country's second and fourth-largest mobile phone carriers would be bad for competition.

The $39 million deal has been under scrutiny from lawmakers and consumer groups, and the number-three carrier, Sprint Nextel, objects. The government's decision to sue to block the merger comes despite AT&T's efforts to make it more politically palatable. Most recently, AT&T pledged to bring back thousands of call center jobs from overseas.

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