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Podcast: Take A Walking Tour Of The High Line

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Special Episode: High Line Guided Tour

Special Episode: High Line Guided Tour

Pedestrians stroll down a walkway as others relax on a stretch of lawn after the second section of the High Line, an industrial era elevated railway line converted into a city park, opened to the public one day early in New York, Tuesday, June 7, 2011. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens) Kathy Willens/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Pedestrians stroll down a walkway as others relax on a stretch of lawn after the second section of the High Line, an industrial era elevated railway line converted into a city park, opened to the public one day early in New York, Tuesday, June 7, 2011. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Kathy Willens/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Podcast: Take A Walking Tour Of The High Line

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140171967/140128362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A decade ago, residents thought an old rail line above the city was an eyesore and wanted it torn down. Today, it's one of Manhattan's most popular public spaces. A new book gives the inside story of how Joshua David and Robert Hammond saved the abandoned track.

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