Family, Friends Of Sept. 11 Victims: 'We Remember'

"Welles was a young man who loved everybody... even though these were people he'd never met... that he rescued and saved and led to safety down those stairs, for him it was just totally natural. He knew what he had to do. And he did his duty" — Jefferson Crowther, with his wife, Alison. i i

hide caption"Welles was a young man who loved everybody... even though these were people he'd never met... that he rescued and saved and led to safety down those stairs, for him it was just totally natural. He knew what he had to do. And he did his duty" — Jefferson Crowther, with his wife, Alison.

Cheryl Senter/NPR
"Welles was a young man who loved everybody... even though these were people he'd never met... that he rescued and saved and led to safety down those stairs, for him it was just totally natural. He knew what he had to do. And he did his duty" — Jefferson Crowther, with his wife, Alison.

"Welles was a young man who loved everybody... even though these were people he'd never met... that he rescued and saved and led to safety down those stairs, for him it was just totally natural. He knew what he had to do. And he did his duty" — Jefferson Crowther, with his wife, Alison.

Cheryl Senter/NPR
"It's like the only thing on his mind was to tell the kids that he loved them, and I tell the kids this every day," Monique Ferrer says of her ex-husband. i i

hide caption"It's like the only thing on his mind was to tell the kids that he loved them, and I tell the kids this every day," Monique Ferrer says of her ex-husband.

Harriet Jones/NPR
"It's like the only thing on his mind was to tell the kids that he loved them, and I tell the kids this every day," Monique Ferrer says of her ex-husband.

"It's like the only thing on his mind was to tell the kids that he loved them, and I tell the kids this every day," Monique Ferrer says of her ex-husband.

Harriet Jones/NPR

On the tenth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, NPR's Audie Cornish talks with StoryCorps families to find out how they make their way today. We Remember is an hour-long special that gives an intimate look at lives forever changed by the attacks — the people who lost sons and wives, daughters and grandfathers, and good friends.

"The families are among the most courageous and amazing human beings I have ever met," says StoryCorps founder Dave Isay. "These are hard stories to listen to. But this is about remembering."

To do that, StoryCorps began an initiative with the National 9/11 Memorial and Museum in 2006, on the fifth anniversary of the attacks. Their goal is to record at least one story to memorialize every life that was lost on Sept. 11, 2001.

"The enormity of Sept. 11 is very difficult to conceive. And the only way that we can understand the loss is to break it down into the individual stories, to each of the lives, through storytelling," Isay says. "We're trying to make sure that families have this record of lives of loved ones that will live on, and that all of us can understand the enormity of what happened on that day, can think about the lives that were lost and never forget."

"When I met Karen, she relaxed me, and she showed me how to live in a city of stress without the stress, " says Richard Pecorella. i i

hide caption"When I met Karen, she relaxed me, and she showed me how to live in a city of stress without the stress, " says Richard Pecorella.

Jeffrey Alan Jones /NPR
"When I met Karen, she relaxed me, and she showed me how to live in a city of stress without the stress, " says Richard Pecorella.

"When I met Karen, she relaxed me, and she showed me how to live in a city of stress without the stress, " says Richard Pecorella.

Jeffrey Alan Jones /NPR

These are stories from families and friends who tell us about their loved ones and their loss. The father who recalls the last words he shared with his son, the recovery worker who discovers a new meaning for normal, the fireman's daughter who knew that her dad who perished in the line of duty wouldn't have wanted it any other way.

Here's a list of the participants whose stories are included in the one-hour special We Remember. In cases where their stories have aired on NPR's Morning Edition, we've included links to the original broadcast:

This audio special was produced by Kerry Thompson for NPR and Dave Isay and Isaac Kestenbaum for StoryCorps, in partnership with the National September 11 Memorial and Museum. Web production by Bill Chappell.

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