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Amazon May Use 7-Eleven As Package Pick-Up Station

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Amazon May Use 7-Eleven As Package Pick-Up Station

Business

Amazon May Use 7-Eleven As Package Pick-Up Station

Amazon May Use 7-Eleven As Package Pick-Up Station

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140242038/140242066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amazon.com is testing out a new delivery system in Seattle. It involves a customer picking up their Amazon order at a nearby 7-Eleven.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Our last word in business today is P.O. Box 7-Eleven.

The convenient store chain 7-Eleven might become a package pickup station for Amazon.com customers. The company is testing out this new delivery idea in Seattle. If you're one of those customers who orders from Amazon and you're just not home when the delivery truck arrives, you're the target here. Amazon wants to let you ship items to a 7-Eleven near your home or business.

The iPad newspaper The Daily first reported this and says when a package arrives you get a bar code emailed to your smartphone. You scan the bar code at 7-Eleven, punch in a pin number, and viola, you retrieve you package from a special locker.

(Soundbite of music)

GREENE: The folks at 7-Eleven are probably hoping you'll retrieve a coffee or a Slurpee while you're there.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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