Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: What I Did On My Summer Vacation, Love Is Blind (and Stupid), An Idea That Should Be Flushed, and Crying the Friendly Skies.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Paula Poundstone, Charlie Pierce and Kyrie O'Connor. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you, Carl. Thank you everybody.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Carl dares to wear rhyme after Labor Day, in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, though, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Kyrie, UCLA student Chris Jeon is a go-getter. Before his senior year he wanted a great vacation and he got one. What did he do?

KYRIE O: Before his senior year he wanted a great vacation and he got one.

SAGAL: Yeah, he just did this recently. Apparently, they have great hostels in Tripoli.

CONNOR: He went to Libya.

SAGAL: To do what?

CONNOR: Be a freedom fighter.

SAGAL: Exactly. He joined the rebels in Libya.

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CONNOR: Isn't that a great vacation?

SAGAL: It sure absolutely is.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A reporter covering...

CONNOR: That's a terrible vacation.

SAGAL: A reporter covering the civil war in Libya noticed something odd about one of the rebels. Instead of fatigues, he was wearing an L.A. Lakers jersey.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Chris Jeon, he'll be returning to UCLA for his senior year said, quote, "I told my friends a sick vacation would be to come here and fight with the rebels."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Jeon says it will all be worth it if the Libyan people are free and if he can get internship credit.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

CONNOR: He's going to get lucky in about a nanosecond.

SAGAL: You think so? And this is true, when the reporter found him, he said to the guy - he said this on CNN - he said, whatever you do, don't tell my parents I'm here.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

CONNOR: Man.

CHARLIE PIERCE: They think I'm drunk in Cabo.

SAGAL: Exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Paula, a Welsh woman who went on a date with a man she met on Facebook was surprised to discover he wasn't looking for romance, he was looking for what?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Welsh instructions.

SAGAL: No. Some vowels. No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Welsh joke. Among his likes on Facebook, people who keep the engine running while he knocks off liquor stores.

POUNDSTONE: Oh right, I do know. Yeah, he made her help him rob.

SAGAL: By performing what role?

POUNDSTONE: Did she have to drive the car?

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: The getaway car?

SAGAL: She was the getaway driver. He was looking for a getaway driver.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Leah Gibbs and Adam Minton seemed to really hit it off when they met on Facebook, chatted back and forth. But it turns out they wanted different things. She wanted to really get to know him as a person. He wanted an escape from a crime scene.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So she drives over to his house to watch a DVD. That was their plan. But first he says, hey, can you give me a lift down to the local betting parlor.

And so they go down and he runs in, and he comes out holding a bag of money and a knife. And he jumps in her car and he yells, go, go, go. And this is the great part, she says that it was only later, while she was driving him back home, and he became rude, that's when she, quote, "decided the date was over."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Charlie?

PIERCE: Uh-huh.

SAGAL: Charlie, following the success of room and house sharing sites like couchsurfer and home exchange, a new smartphone app called Cloo enables you to rent your what to people in need?

PIERCE: Your library to Colonel Mustard, so he can kill somebody.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Although I see why you said that. In this case, Cloo is spelled C-L-O-O.

PIERCE: Oh.

CONNOR: Oh.

PIERCE: You can rent your water closet?

SAGAL: Yes, your bathroom.

PIERCE: Your chintz.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

PIERCE: Your facilities.

SAGAL: Yes, exactly. We've all been there.

PIERCE: Your toilet.

SAGAL: You're out in the big city and you're in need of a clean...

PIERCE: Running out of synonyms here, Peter.

SAGAL: I know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, it's your bathroom. We'll be frank. We've all been there. You're out in the big city and you're in need of a clean bathroom. Well, all you need do now is pull our your smartphone, start up your Cloo app, search for nearby private homes who have signed into the service, contact the owners until you find somebody that is home and can let you in. Wait while they do a background check on you.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And then realize this has taken way too long, and start shopping for a new pair of pants.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PIERCE: Mommy, why is that man jumping from one foot to the other on the sidewalk?

SAGAL: Exactly. This is being sold as a kind of social networking app.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know. You know, use bathrooms, meet people, it'll be fun, you know. You have a common interest. You need a bathroom, they have a bathroom. You have so much to talk about. But it raises the question, who would you rather meet less? Somebody not smart enough to find a Starbucks or a gas station?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Or somebody willing to rent their bathroom out to strangers?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Ooh, got to put some fresh potpourri over the toilet. Don't know who's going to show up today.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: It really does invite - yeah, yeah, because there's got to be a lot of different categories, even in terms of the need for the bathroom.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: There are people who are just casual and people who are looking for a serious relationship with your toilet.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

SAGAL: Is that what you're saying?

POUNDSTONE: What I would be willing...

SAGAL: Really wanting a commitment.

PIERCE: I think there's got to be some sort of time limit here, too.

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

PIERCE: I mean you were planning to go out for dinner and some, you know, 70-year-old guy from Iowa has been in there for an hour and a half. I mean...

SAGAL: Exactly.

PIERCE: It's going to complicate things tremendously.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yeah, he didn't say that on the application.

SAGAL: No.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah, I would be willing to leave a soda bottle on the porch.

SAGAL: All right.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We'll let America know that.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

SAGAL: Paula.

POUNDSTONE: Do you want my address?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And, Paula, passengers on some Virgin Atlantic flights are being warned of an unexpected risk during flight. The airline will now tell passengers in advance if there's a chance that what might happen?

POUNDSTONE: The Internet might cut out.

SAGAL: No. I'll give you a hint. They'll say, well the exits are over there, the life jackets are under your seat, and the Kleenex is in your seat back.

POUNDSTONE: They might play a really sad song.

SAGAL: Close enough. They're going to be warning passengers that the in-flight movie might make them cry.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: I love that.

SAGAL: You do?

POUNDSTONE: Oh, yes.

SAGAL: This is what happened. Forty-one percent of male Virgin Atlantic travelers admitted that at one time or another they had hid under blankets to cover their tears.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: During particularly moving in-flight films. So the airline announced they're going to hold up signs warning passengers if the movie is a potential tearjerker.

POUNDSTONE: Oh, yes.

CONNOR: Where did they get blankets?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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