Story Corps: Sept. 11 Survivor Recalls Day John Yates was working at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. His office sustained a near-direct hit from American Airlines Flight 77, and Yates suffered burns on almost 40 percent of his body. He recounted the events of that morning.
NPR logo

Story Corps: Sept. 11 Survivor Recalls Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140374686/140374661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Story Corps: Sept. 11 Survivor Recalls Day

Story Corps: Sept. 11 Survivor Recalls Day

Story Corps: Sept. 11 Survivor Recalls Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140374686/140374661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Yates was working at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. His office sustained a near-direct hit from American Airlines Flight 77, and Yates suffered burns on almost 40 percent of his body. He recounted the events of that morning.

AUDIE CORNISH, Host:

At StoryCorps, Yates recounted the events of that morning.

JOHN YATES: And I remember seeing just strings of skin, which was hanging off my hands from the burns. There's a lot of things that I don't remember to this day. But I remember a medic cutting all my clothes off of me. And my wife waking me up, and I thought it was still September 11th. But it was September 13th. You know, when I went to watch what was going on in New York, I was standing in the middle of five people. And I'm the only one that survived.

CORNISH: These 9/11 stories will be housed at the National September 11th Memorial and Museum. All StoryCorps recordings are archived at the Library of Congress.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CORNISH: You'll find more reflections on today's anniversary, and images and music - and through blogging of today's events - at our website, at NPR.org.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.