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In Shanksville, Pa., Flight 93 Remembered

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In Shanksville, Pa., Flight 93 Remembered

Remembrances

In Shanksville, Pa., Flight 93 Remembered

In Shanksville, Pa., Flight 93 Remembered

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140376450/140374805" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Sept. 11, 2001, United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into an abandoned strip mine. The flight, which carried 44 people, including four hijackers, was heralded for the actions of passengers who apparently attempted to overpower the terrorists. Audie Cornish talks to NPR's John Ydstie about Sunday's events in Shanksville, Pa., where a moment of silence will mark the crash.

AUDIE CORNISH, host: And we are listening to the ceremonies at ground zero, the World Trade Center site. We have family members who are reading the names, honoring those killed 10 years ago.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: ...we love and miss you so very much. Keep watching over us, handsome.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

CORNISH: A moment of silence, observing the time of the fall of the South Tower of the World Trade Center at 9:59 a.m. on September 11, 2001.

(SOUNDBITE OF SILENCE)

Governor CHRIS CHRISTIE: Today as you look over the walls of remembrance, we want to share with you the words of the poet Mary Lee Hall, who wrote "Turn Again to Life". If I should die and leave you here a while, be not like others sore undone, who keep long vigil by the silent...

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