Is It Time To End The War On Terror?

Richard Falkenrath (left) and Michael Hayden argue against the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate. i i

hide captionRichard Falkenrath (left) and Michael Hayden argue against the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.

Chris Vultaggio
Richard Falkenrath (left) and Michael Hayden argue against the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.

Richard Falkenrath (left) and Michael Hayden argue against the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.

Chris Vultaggio

Ten years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, is it time to move on from the war on terror?

Some argue that it should no longer define U.S. national security policy, saying the open-ended conflict is taking up money and attention that would be better used elsewhere. They argue the threat from al-Qaida has diminished after the death of Osama bin Laden and other leaders of the terrorist group.

Others counter that ending the war on terror would take away the tools that the United States needs to protect its citizens from terrorists. Even if the threat has been reduced, they say, it isn't gone, and continued vigilance is still required.

A panel of experts recently faced off, two against two, on the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" in an Oxford-style debate, part of the Intelligence Squared U.S. series.

Before the debate, the audience at New York University's Skirball Center for the Performing Arts voted 41 percent in favor of the motion and 28 percent against, with 31 percent undecided. After the debate, 46 percent supported the motion and 43 percent opposed it — making the side arguing against the motion "It's Time to End the War on Terror" the winners of the debate. Eleven percent remained undecided.

John Donvan, correspondent for ABC News' Nightline, moderated the debate on Sept. 7. Those debating:

FOR THE MOTION

CNN National Security Analyst Peter Bergen is one of the few Americans who interviewed bin Laden face-to-face. Bergen is the author of The Longest War: The Enduring Conflict Between America and Al-Qaeda and editor of the AfPak Channel. Bergen is director of the national security program at the New America Foundation and a research fellow at New York University's Center on Law and Security.

Peter Bergen and Juliette Kayyem argued in favor of ending the war on terror during the debate. i i

hide captionPeter Bergen and Juliette Kayyem argued in favor of ending the war on terror during the debate.

Chris Vultaggio
Peter Bergen and Juliette Kayyem argued in favor of ending the war on terror during the debate.

Peter Bergen and Juliette Kayyem argued in favor of ending the war on terror during the debate.

Chris Vultaggio

Juliette Kayyem formerly served in the Obama administration as assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs at the Department of Homeland Security. Then the highest ranking Arab-American woman in federal government, she is now is a professor at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and a foreign affairs columnist for the Boston Globe.

AGAINST THE MOTION

Richard Falkenrath was deputy homeland security adviser under President George W. Bush. The principal author of the National Strategy for Homeland Security, Falkenrath is now a principal at The Chertoff Group, a global security and risk-management advisory firm, an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a contributing editor at Bloomberg News.

Former CIA Director Michael Hayden served in the U.S. Air Force for 39 years and directed the National Security Agency for six. He has also served as commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center and chief of the Central Security Service. He is currently a principal at The Chertoff Group.

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