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Iranian Court Reviews Plan To Offer Hikers Bail

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Iranian Court Reviews Plan To Offer Hikers Bail

Middle East

Iranian Court Reviews Plan To Offer Hikers Bail

Iranian Court Reviews Plan To Offer Hikers Bail

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In Iran Tuesday, President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad told NBC authorities would soon release two American hikers convicted on espionage charges. A lawyer for the hikers also said an appeals court would release them on bail. Judges say they're still reviewing the plan to offer bail.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: We're also tracking a country that is now 32 years beyond its revolution. Iran's government remains deeply opaque. It is hard to know whose word really counts.

DAVID GREENE, host: Yesterday, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivered good news. He told NBC that Iran would soon release two American hikers convicted on espionage charges. A lawyer for the hikers also said an appeals court would release them on bail.

INSKEEP: But now Iran's judiciary has said to slow down. Judges say they are still reviewing the plan to offer bail. That serves as a very public reminder that President Ahmadinejad has no power over the courts, which are overseen, instead, by the ruling clerics. It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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