Lightning Fill In The Blank

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/140549488/140549475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

PETER SAGAL, host: Now, onto our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have sixty seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL, host: We have a tie, Peter. Peter Grosz, Roxanne Roberts and Roy Blount, Jr., they all have three points each.

SAGAL: Oh my gosh, all right.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well we have randomly selected an order for you to go. So Peter, here we go. The clock will start when I begin your first question. Fill in the blank. Thousands of people visited the National September 11th Memorial that opened at the site of the blank.

PETER GROSZ: Former World Trade Center.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In the election on Tuesday, Democrats lost the House seat held by tweeting congressman blank.

GROSZ: Anthony Weiner.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Investigations have been launched over a Department of Energy loan given to Solyndra, a now bankrupt company that made blank.

GROSZ: Solar energy.

SAGAL: Yeah, solar panels.

GROSZ: Solar panels.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Best known for his Oscar winning performance in the movie "Charlie," actor blank died at age 88.

GROSZ: Cliff Robertson.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The comic strip Doonesbury featured excerpts this week of Joe McGinness' unauthorized biography of blank.

GROSZ: Sarah Palin.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A packed commuter train in India went 600 miles before the passengers or engineers realized blank.

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

GROSZ: They were actually in Indiana.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: I guess after 600 miles you'd be out of India.

SAGAL: Yeah.

GROSZ: 600 miles before they realized they were going the wrong way.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: They went 600 miles in the wrong way. And that is the distance, if you will, from Washington to Chicago. They went, wait a minute?

GROSZ: We should have been in the middle of the Atlantic.

SAGAL: Well you know how you tend to...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know how you tend to zone out when you're on the train? Apparently people in India do that too. Apparently none of the thousand passengers on the commuter train noticed that they had gone half a continent the wrong way.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Peter do on our quiz?

KASELL: Peter had six correct answers, for twelve more points. He now has fifteen points, and Peter has the lead.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well done. All right, Roxanne, you're up next. Fill in the blank. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the United States remains hopeful that two hikers will be freed from prison in blank.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Iran.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The Taliban launched an attack on the US embassy and NATO headquarters in blank on Tuesday.

ROBERTS: In Kabul.

SAGAL: Yeah, Kabul.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In an attempt to save five billion dollars a year, Bank of America announced it was cutting 30,000 blank.

ROBERTS: Jobs.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A British parliamentary committee announced that it would be recalling blank to testify a second time about the phone hacking scandal.

ROBERTS: James Murdoch.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A Swedish man who heard a strange noise coming from his neighbor's backyard discovered blank.

ROBERTS: An elk in a tree. A drunken elk in a tree.

SAGAL: Yes. A friend of yours, Rox?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The debut of their partnership with designer Missoni cause the website for discount store blank to crash multiple times.

ROBERTS: Target.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The Swiss bank UBS blamed a rogue trader for blanking.

ROBERTS: For losing two billion dollars.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg says a video of New York City cops bumping and grinding with parade goers just proves blank.

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

ROBERTS: That they're fun-loving. He didn't think anything was wrong with it.

SAGAL: Yes. Well basically what he said was that means the cops are very friendly.

ROBERTS: Yes, fun.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: I'll give it to you. Officers patrolling the West Indian Day Parade were simply fulfilling their pledge to protect and serve the scantily clad booties of the revelers by shielding them with their police crotches.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So if that is Mayor Bloomberg's definition of being friendly, we advise you to be careful about being friends with Mayor Bloomberg.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Rox do on our quiz?

KASELL: Eight correct answers, sixteen points. She now has nineteen points and the lead.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well done, Roxanne. So how many then does Roy need to win?

KASELL: Well, he needs at least eight to tie, nine to win outright.

SAGAL: All right, Roy, this is for the game. Fill in the blank. According to a report this week, for the first time in 27 years, one in six Americans is living in blank.

ROY BLOUNT: Poverty.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: For his actions during a firefight in Afghanistan, Marine Dakota Meyer received the blank from President Obama on Thursday.

BLOUNT: The Congressional Medal of Honor.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Because her plane at Dulles Airport was being evacuated, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg was forced to blank.

BLOUNT: Slide down the chute I guess.

SAGAL: Yes, she did.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Two women in Tennessee were arrested for stealing artwork from blank.

BLOUNT: Oh, I know this. From a - oh god, it wasn't from the museum, it was from Arby's, Arby's, Arby's.

SAGAL: Yes, their local Arby's.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: A study released in the Journal of Pediatrics this week says that cartoons like blank are bad for kids.

BLOUNT: Sponge Pants.

SAGAL: Spongebob Squarepants, yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Saying it could revolutionize the newspaper industry, one manufacturer has come up with blank?

(SOUNDBITE OF GONG)

BLOUNT: Revolutionary? Liquid paper.

SAGAL: Almost, lickable ink.

BLOUNT: Oh.

SAGAL: The new Taste-It Notes could make the pages of newspapers taste like food. This could save the industry because while we hate newspapers, we love food.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Better still, articles could taste like whatever they're about. Meaning from now on, people will pay even less attention to Joe Lieberman.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, did Roy do well enough to win?

KASELL: He needed at least eight correct answers, Peter. Roy had just five correct answers. So with nineteen points, Roxanne Roberts is this weeks' champion.

SAGAL: There she goes.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well done, Roxanne.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.