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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

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Our panelists predict where that $2 billion lost by a UBS trader will be found.

PETER SAGAL, host: Now, panel, where will UBS find the missing two billion dollars? Mr. Peter Grosz?

PETER GROSZ: No one is really sure, but this rogue trader's fianc´┐Ż has been seen sporting a 400 carat engagement ring.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roxanne Roberts?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Turns out, he spent ten dollars on a bag of pot and the rest on munchies at 7-Eleven.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roy Blount, Jr.?

ROY BLOUNT: Well, it's going to be a place so obvious that it's the last place you'd look. But it's not going to be in just one place, in one lump. So I would suggest investigators to go to this man's house and I bet they will find thousands of Swiss toasters.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT: Or fondue pots, or whatever you get as premium when you invest and put money into other Swiss banks.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

CARL KASELL, host: Well, if the money turns up in any of those places, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks to John Bell and the staff at Oregon Public Broadcasting. Thanks to Peter Grosz, Roxanne Roberts, Roy Blount, Jr. Thanks to our fabulous audience here in Portland. And thanks to all of you for listening. I am Peter Sagal. We will see you next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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