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Nashville Schools Rock Music Education

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Nashville Schools Rock Music Education

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Nashville Schools Rock Music Education

Nashville Schools Rock Music Education

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When many public schools are cutting back on arts education, schools in Nashville are expanding their music departments and offering classes in country, rock and rap. Host Scott Simon reflects.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Nashville announced this week it will expand music in its schools to offer classes in country, rock, Latin and rap, as well as orchestra, choir and band. Just makes sense to take advantage of this asset we have here, said Mayor Karl Dean. Some of the biggest, richest names along Nashville's Music Row will help raise money for the classes.

Studies show that music education can also help a student's math scores and creative skills. Randy Goodman, the president of Lyric Street Records, learned how to play drums in a Nashville high school and said: We want to make sure the next generation isn't left out of that musical experience. Whether it becomes their vocation or not, it's a connection to the roots of what this city is all about.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

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