Three-Minute Fiction

We've started reading through the short stories that hundreds of listeners have submitted so far in this round of the Three-Minute Fiction contest. Our judge, author Danielle Evans, will pick a winner several weeks from now. It's not too late to put your 600-word story in mix. For full rules and to submit your story go to our website, npr.org/threeminutefiction.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

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RAZ: Now a quick reminder that Round Seven of Three-Minute Fiction is open. Our judge this round, author Danielle Evans. And over in our Three-Minute Fiction Facebook page, a lot of FAQs, frequently asked questions, like what's Danielle looking for? Danielle?

DANIELLE EVANS: I'm looking for the stories that sit with me after I walk away from them. I'm looking for the things that I'm still thinking about while I'm making dinner or walking down the street or getting on the train. That I'm still like, huh, that surprised me in an interesting way.

RAZ: And many of you have asked if you can resubmit your story to correct minor spelling or grammatical errors. The answer, sadly, is no. But don't worry. A good story is a good story. We won't hold the mistakes against you. And finally, some confusion about the challenge this round, which is this: In every story, one character has to leave town and one has to arrive.

Now some of you have wondered, does it have to be a specific location? Can it be a spiritual coming and leaving? Here's Three-Minute Fiction producer, Kenya Young, to clarify.

KENYA YOUNG: I've been working with Three-Minute Fiction a while now. I've been working with the judges and the readers. And the best advice I can give you is to interpret the challenge the way you want and just write. There's no right or wrong answer. If you do something creative, imaginative, intriguing, totally out of the box, that's great. The more creative, the better, honestly. As long as your story supports the challenge, I say go for it.

RAZ: That's our Three-Minute Fiction producer Kenya Young. We're accepting submissions for this round through next Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, so you have one more week. To see the full rules and to submit your story, go to our website. That's npr.org/threeminutefiction. And threeminutefiction is all spelled out, no spaces. And good luck.

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