Comedy 'Modern Family' Captures Multiple Emmys

The 1960s Madison Avenue saga Mad Men won its fourth consecutive Emmy Award for best drama series. Modern Family won its second consecutive trophy for best comedy.

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DAVID GREENE, host: This is pretty much how it went on the 63rd annual Emmy Awards last night.

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UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: And the Emmy goes to "Modern Family."

GREENE: The sitcom about an extended family won five awards from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, more than any other show. The first award - for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy - went to Julie Bowen. She plays the neurotic mother Claire Dunphy on "Modern Family."

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JULIE BOWEN: Oh, I don't know what I am going to talk about in therapy next week now. This is - I won something.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: Ty Burrell won Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy for playing her husband. The writing and directing comedy awards went the same way.

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UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: Michael Allen Spiller, "Modern Family."

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #3: Steven Levitan

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: And Jeffrey Richman.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #3: "Modern Family."

JANE LYNCH: Welcome back to the "Modern Family" Awards. You know, we decided to throw them into the drama category just to see what happens.

INSKEEP: That was Jane Lynch, in her first time hosting the Emmys.

GREENE: A lot of "Modern Family," but there were a few surprises last night - like the Best Actor win for Kyle Chandler. He played a high school football coach on the critically acclaimed drama "Friday Night Lights," which was canceled this year.

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KYLE CHANDLER, host: I knew for a fact that I would not be standing here, so I did not worry about writing anything. And now, I am starting to worry.

GREENE: See, you heard an actor saying she'd have nothing to discuss with the therapist after winning. Turns out winning creates its own anxiety.

INSKEEP: Other surprises: Best Supporting Actress in a Drama, Margo Martindale for "Justified"; and Best Supporting Actor in a Drama, Peter Dinklage for "Game of Thrones."

GREENE: In the show categories, "Mad Men" won Best Drama for the fourth year in a row. "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" won its category for the ninth straight year.

INSKEEP: The last award of the night went back to "Modern Family" - Best Comedy, just like last year. Here's executive producer Steven Levitan.

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STEVEN LEVITAN: Last season we were on location, and a gay couple came up to us and said you're not just making people laugh, you're making them more tolerant. And I thought to myself, they're right, we are showing the world that there's absolutely nothing wrong with a loving, committed relationship between an old man and a hot young woman. And looking around this room tonight, I see many of you agree.

GREENE: The Emmys had some controversy. Fox dropped a pre-taped joke Alec Baldwin made about phone hacking. Fox is owned by News Corp., which is in the middle of hacking scandal. Baldwin boycotted the awards as a result.

INSKEEP: Fox, after all, was trying to use the Emmy broadcast to promote its slate of new shows for the fall.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Premieres this Tuesday after

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: two-night premiere begins this Wednesday

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #4: World premiere, Monday, September 26, on Fox.

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