Study: Most Adult Cellphone Users Are Texting

The Pew Research Center has released a new survey on text messaging. It says the vast majority of Americans now own cellphones, and the vast majority of those people use text messages. People ages 18 to 24 send, on average, 110 messages per day.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Now by all rights, we really should not tell today's last word in business. Instead, we should just send a text message to your phone.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

The Pew Research Center released a new survey, yesterday, on text messaging. It gives you an idea just how widespread the practice is.

INSKEEP: The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones...

GREENE: And the vast majority of them use text messages, though some people do it more often than others, especially younger people.

INSKEEP: People between the age of 18 and 24, according to the survey, send on average about 110 messages per day.

GREENE: And many of them say if you're going to contact them, a text message is preferable to an actual voice call. Don't talk. Text. That's the business news...

INSKEEP: David? David?

GREENE: Yes, sir?

INSKEEP: Send me a message about that, will you?

GREENE: I'll send you a message, Steve.

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