America's 2nd Largest Indian Tribe Expels Blacks

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/140630565/140630558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript
Black Freedmen, who are descended from the slaves of Cherokee Indians, protest  their expulsion on Sept.  2 outside a regional Bureau of Indian Affairs office in Muskogee, Okla. Marilyn Vann, in pink, is the president of the Descendants of Freedmen Association.

Black Freedmen, who are descended from the slaves of Cherokee Indians, protest their expulsion on Sept. 2 outside a regional Bureau of Indian Affairs office in Muskogee, Okla. Marilyn Vann, in pink, is the president of the Descendants of Freedmen Association. Alex Kellogg/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Kellogg/NPR

The Cherokee Nation recently stripped citizenship from a majority of African-Americans who descended from slaves of wealthy Cherokee Indians before the Civil War. Host Michel Martin discusses this controversial move with MacArthur Fellow Tiya Miles, who studies interrelated histories of African-Americans and Native Americans.

Related NPR Stories

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.