NPR logo

The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140766784/140766765" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

Fine Art

The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140766784/140766765" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Sunday, the National Gallery of Art opens Warhol: Headlines, an exhibit of the late artist's works depicting the front pages of American newspapers. Host Scott Simon tells us more about how Andy Warhol regarded the news business.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Tomorrow, the National Gallery of Art opens "Warhol: Headlines" an exhibit of the late artists' works depicting the news industry in America. Andy Warhol would recreate front pages of New York newspapers in the way he did Campbell's soup cans, occasionally adding a change or flourish.

W: I'm confused about who the news belongs to, he once said. I always have it in my head that if your name is in the news, then the news should be paying you, because it's your news and they're taking it and selling it as their product. But then they always say that they're helping you. And that's true too. But still, if people didn't give the news their news, and if everybody kept their news to themselves, the news wouldn't have any news.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.