The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

On Sunday, the National Gallery of Art opens Warhol: Headlines, an exhibit of the late artist's works depicting the front pages of American newspapers. Host Scott Simon tells us more about how Andy Warhol regarded the news business.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Tomorrow, the National Gallery of Art opens "Warhol: Headlines" an exhibit of the late artists' works depicting the news industry in America. Andy Warhol would recreate front pages of New York newspapers in the way he did Campbell's soup cans, occasionally adding a change or flourish.

W: "Madonna: I'm Not Ashamed" overlaid with hundreds of Keith Haring signature action figures.

Could the real message be that President Reagan's denunciation of terrorism appears in much smaller type?

Andy Warhol thought that news was as familiar and saleable as a can of soup, and wondered why people complained about it.

I'm confused about who the news belongs to, he once said. I always have it in my head that if your name is in the news, then the news should be paying you, because it's your news and they're taking it and selling it as their product. But then they always say that they're helping you. And that's true too. But still, if people didn't give the news their news, and if everybody kept their news to themselves, the news wouldn't have any news.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.