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Salvadoran Treats Win N.Y. Street Food Award

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Salvadoran Treats Win N.Y. Street Food Award

Business

Salvadoran Treats Win N.Y. Street Food Award

Salvadoran Treats Win N.Y. Street Food Award

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140798954/140798941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Pupusas took the highest honor at New Yorks' seventh annual Vendy awards — a competition for the best street vendor food. Solber Pupusas is the winner of the coveted Vendy Cup. Chef Reina Bermudez makes the thick Salvadoran tortillas from maize flour and fills them with savories like pork and cheese. She told the New York Daily News that her papusas are special because she "makes everything with a lot of love."

DAVID GREENE, Host:

And today's last word in business is top treats out on the street. Pupusas took the highest honor at New York's seventh annual Vendy awards. That's a competition for the best street vendor food.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And the cart known as Solber Pupusas is the winner of the coveted Vendy Cup. Chef Reina Bermudez who makes the thick Salvadoran tortillas from maize flour and fills them with savories like pork and cheese.

GREENE: She told the New York Daily News that her papusas are special because she makes everything with a lot of love.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Now there is a precious commodity that does not go up and down with the markets, Steve. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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