Study Examines Where Americans Turn To For News

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David Greene and Steve Inskeep report on the latest findings from the Pew Research Center about how people gather information about their local communities. A study out Monday finds people are using a blend of new and old media platforms, depending on the topic.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

So Andy Warhol never saw YouTube or the way how Twitter has changed how information is distributed, but as we heard, he did have an appreciation for what our news consumption says about us, and that's the subject of a study that's out today from the Pew Research Center.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It focuses on how people gather information about their local communities. The survey finds people are using a blend of new and old media platforms, depending on the topic. For coverage of weather, traffic, and breaking news, many rely on local TV news and radio, as you may be doing seconds from now. But when it comes to a wide array of civic matters like arts and culture, taxes and government, more people still turn to newspapers or newspaper websites.

GREENE: According to the study, no one source of news dominates. Most respondents say they get their news from at least three different sources every week.

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GREENE: Your source of news this morning is NPR News.

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