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Doritos Developer Arch West Dies At 97

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Doritos Developer Arch West Dies At 97

Business

Doritos Developer Arch West Dies At 97

Doritos Developer Arch West Dies At 97

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140834497/140815813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Arch West, who invented Doritos more than 45 years ago, died last week in Dallas at age 97. He was a Frito-Lay marketing vice president when he developed the chip, inspired by a bag of toasted tortillas he bought on a family vacation in Southern California. Despite some resistance from the company, he ushered in a whole new era of junk food.

DAVID GREENE, host: And our last word in business today is: Don't touch my Doritos. The line comes from a TV ad for one of the country's most popular snack foods. Doritos were invented more than 45 years ago by a Frito-Lay marketing vice president named Arch West. He had been inspired by a bag of toasted tortillas he bought on a family vacation in Southern California.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And despite some resistance from the company, he ushered in a whole new era of junk food. No matter what you say about the health effects of so many snacks, Mr. West lived to the age of 97 before he died last week in Dallas.

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INSKEEP: And his family says that when they bury his remains this weekend, they intend to sprinkle his grave with Doritos. The neighborhood birds may thank them. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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