A Nation's Landmark: The Washington Monument

  • Suspended by ropes, an engineer begins the process of conducting a block-by-block inspection of the Washington Monument's exterior on Tuesday.
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    Suspended by ropes, an engineer begins the process of conducting a block-by-block inspection of the Washington Monument's exterior on Tuesday.
    Win McNamee/Getty Images
  • Cracks on the top west face of the Washington Monument on Aug. 25, two days after a 5.8 magnitude earthquake struck the East Coast. The National Park Service has closed the landmark indefinitely owing to the damage from the quake.
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    Cracks on the top west face of the Washington Monument on Aug. 25, two days after a 5.8 magnitude earthquake struck the East Coast. The National Park Service has closed the landmark indefinitely owing to the damage from the quake.
    Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
  • A perigee moon rises next to the Washington Monument on March 19. A perigee moon is visible when the moon's orbit position is at its closest point to Earth during a full moon phase.
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    A perigee moon rises next to the Washington Monument on March 19. A perigee moon is visible when the moon's orbit position is at its closest point to Earth during a full moon phase.
    Jewel Samad/Getty Images
  • In 1996, the Washington Monument Restoration Project began; it took four years and $10 million. Here, the monument is covered in project scaffolding, in 1999.
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    In 1996, the Washington Monument Restoration Project began; it took four years and $10 million. Here, the monument is covered in project scaffolding, in 1999.
    Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images
  • Spectators watch the Independence Day fireworks in 1996 at the grounds of the monument.
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    Spectators watch the Independence Day fireworks in 1996 at the grounds of the monument.
    Mark Wilson/AP
  • The top of the monument and part of a U.S. flag are reflected in the sunglasses of Austin Clinton Brown, 9, who joined the civil rights March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. Over 200,000 demonstrators attended the rally.
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    The top of the monument and part of a U.S. flag are reflected in the sunglasses of Austin Clinton Brown, 9, who joined the civil rights March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. Over 200,000 demonstrators attended the rally.
    AP
  • Martin Luther King Jr. waves to supporters on the Mall during the March on Washington, where he later delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.
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    Martin Luther King Jr. waves to supporters on the Mall during the March on Washington, where he later delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.
    AFP/Getty Images
  • Aerial view of the tidal basin in Washington, D.C., taken in 1949.
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    Aerial view of the tidal basin in Washington, D.C., taken in 1949.
    National Archives/Newsmakers/Getty Images
  • The monument was built between 1848 and 1884 but was not officially open to the public until Oct. 9, 1888.
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    The monument was built between 1848 and 1884 but was not officially open to the public until Oct. 9, 1888.
    National Archives/Newsmakers/Getty Images

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