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Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: The New Stars of Reality TV: Chairs; and Cheech and Chong Get Regular.

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PETER SAGAL, host: All right, panel, now just some questions for you from the week's news. Faith, as you know, reality shows, reality competition shows are very profitable for the TV networks. The CW network announced it's going to bring Hollywood glitz and glamour to what classic party game?

FAITH SALIE: Is it like spin the bottle?

SAGAL: No, although that would be fun.

SALIE: Truth or Dare?

SAGAL: Your ideas are so much more interesting than the CW network's I have to say.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SALIE: So it's not

SAGAL: Not the parties that like you're going to go to when we're done, but like kid's parties.

SALIE: Oh, a party - duck, duck, goose.

SAGAL: No.

SALIE: Red rover, red rover.

SAGAL: I love this. Keep going.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Oh my god. Come on guys, what am I not

SAGAL: Well I'll give you a hint.

SALIE: Well, yeah.

SAGAL: When the music stops the excitement begins.

SALIE: Musical chairs.

SAGAL: Yes, musical chairs.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: Thank you for my hint.

SAGAL: You're welcome.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Musical chairs may sound like a lame idea for a show, but that's just because it is.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Nonetheless, the new CW show is going to be called "Extreme Musical Chairs."

SALIE: Oh my god.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's extreme, it's not just a kid's game, because they're going to have like obstacles and various conditions. And if you fail to find a seat when the music stops, they execute you.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That's extreme. Children's party games will become the latest fad in reality TV. Upcoming game shows include the controversial and somewhat bloody, "Pin the Tail on the Real Donkey" and "Human Pinata," with the slogan "keep hitting him, there's candy in there somewhere."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MAZ JOBRANI: I'm a comedian and I live in LA. I pitch shows to networks all the time and get nixed.

SAGAL: Right.

JOBRANI: And the musical chairs show is going?

SAGAL: Yeah. Should have thought of that.

JOBRANI: Oh come on.

TOM BODETT: Somebody got that through, yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Maz, 70s stoner comedians Cheech and Chong are back. And in their latest film they're doing what?

JOBRANI: Getting stoned.

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Times have changed. They're no longer pushing dope, they're pushing something else.

JOBRANI: Oh, they're pushing something else.

SAGAL: Yeah.

JOBRANI: Other than dope.

SAGAL: Yeah.

SALIE: Pushing each other's wheelchairs?

JOBRANI: Meditation.

SAGAL: No.

JOBRANI: It's a positive thing?

SAGAL: It's a positive thing.

JOBRANI: It's good for you.

SAGAL: Oh yes.

JOBRANI: They are pushing low carb diets. They are

SAGAL: You're close. I'll give you a hint. They used to be about getting high; now they're about staying regular.

JOBRANI: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: Okay, they're pushing the things that cause you to - you know, the fiber.

SAGAL: Yes, in fact, exactly. It's fiber.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Fiber One brownies.

SALIE: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

SALIE: That's good.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: So these online ads for Fiber One brand brownies, they play like a comeback movie for Cheech and Chong, if you ever saw that movie, in which they drive a van filled with, quote, "magic brownies," to a burning man like festival.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Only to reveal at the end that the brownies are magic because they're high in fiber.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's a great ad campaign. It's really funny, if your idea of a great ad campaign is one that reminds the viewers how incredibly old they've become.

BODETT: Yeah. And I love the scene where they're partying with the Flo-Max guys, you know.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SALIE: They're like, dude, I am so regular right now.

SAGAL: Exactly, yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BODETT: You know, didn't you just know when the baby boom started to age that it was going to get really ugly.

SAGAL: It really did.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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