Bible Belt Oktoberfest Adds Beer To The Party

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To celebrate its German roots, residents of Cullman, Ala., usually donned liederhosen and ate bratwurst in. But keeping with Bible Belt values, beer was verboten. This year kegs are being tapped at what had been billed as the world's only dry Oktoberfest.

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LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Lynn Neary.

For many, Oktoberfest is a good excuse to drink beer. Not so in the town of Cullman, Alabama. To celebrate its German roots, residents of Cullman usually donned lederhosen and ate bratwurst. But in keeping with Bible Belt values, beer was verboten. This year, kegs are being tapped at what had been billed as the world's only dry Oktoberfest. An alcohol-free celebration will still be held nearby. It's MORNING EDITION.

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