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First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

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First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

Television

First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141089066/141090053" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Melissa Block and Guy Raz tell us about this day in history 64 years ago when then-President Harry S Truman gave the nation's first televised address from the White House.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Sixty-four years ago today, then President Harry S. Truman gave the first ever televised address from the White House. The speech wasn't about creating jobs or rebuilding the nation after the Second World War. No. It was about food.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

On this day back in 1947, President Truman urged people to eat less, not for health reasons, but because our allies across the Atlantic were hungry.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

RAZ: The president proposed a few simple rules people could follow at home. One, no meat on Tuesdays. Two, no poultry or eggs on Thursdays and...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

BLOCK: President Truman went on to say that overeating and wastefulness would contribute to inflation here and scarcity abroad so that Europe's battle and ours were one in the same.

The effort was, of course, voluntary, but President Truman wasn't afraid to lay on a little guilt.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

RAZ: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News.

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