Chinese Apple Users Mourn Steve Job's Death

Apple has just opened another store in Shanghai. Between April and the end of June, Apple sold nearly $4 billion worth of products in China. That's a six-fold increase from the year before. One customer said Jobs and his inventions have had a major impact on digital life in China.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Reaction to the death of Steve Jobs are dominating China's version of Twitter today. Apple products are wildly popular there. For more, we turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt in Shanghai.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: I'm standing outside Shanghai's newest Apple store, and there are people here actually taking pictures. Now, this is normal. The store's become something of a landmark here in the city. Inside, the tables are jammed with shoppers, people playing Angry Birds on iPads, looking at the latest iPhones and computers.

LEE LUMING: I think that (unintelligible). He's a genius.

LANGFITT: Lee Luming(ph) is hunched over a MacBook Air, but he's really here to get his iPhone fixed. Lee, who studies management at Shanghai University, says Steve Jobs and his inventions have had a major impact on digital life here.

LUMING: (Foreign language spoken)

LANGFITT: They give people more choices, he says. These kinds of products enrich our lives. That's Apple's contribution. And, Lee adds, they're really fashionable.

LUMING: (Foreign language spoken)

LANGFITT: They're very popular, Lee says. For young Chinese people, having an Apple product is a very cool thing. And, he says...

LUMING: (Foreign language spoken)

LANGFITT: It gives you a lot of faith?

LUMING: Yeah, yeah.

LANGFITT: Between April and the end of June, Apple sold nearly $4 billion worth of products in China. That's a six-fold increase from the year before. On China's Twitter, one writer suggested people here could learn from Jobs, quote: "I hope legendary and innovative figures like Steve Jobs could emerge among Chinese entrepreneurs. They shouldn't be just counterfeiting stuff." Frank Langfitt, NPR News, Shanghai.

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