Finally, There's A Fix For Blurry Photos

Adobe, the company behind Photoshop, recently unveiled prototype software that un-blurs blurry photos. The program analyzes how a camera shook while a photo was being taken, and then figures out what the picture would have looked like if the camera were held steady. The software then enhances the photo.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

These improvements in smartphones bring us to our last word in business: enhance it. It's a scene from countless movies and TV shows, computer experts race to analyze a blurry photograph to find a clue to catch the bad guy.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Enhance it.

MONTAGNE: And magically, the picture is crystal clear. Now that technology is on its way to becoming real. Adobe, the company behind Photoshop, recently unveiled a prototype software that un-blurs blurry photos. The program analyzes how a camera shook while a photo was being taken, then figures out what the picture would've looked like if the camera had been held steady. Voila. The software will enhance it. And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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