Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: Baggies Be Gone, Extreme Droopiness and An Affair to Forget.

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KORVA COLEMAN, host: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Korva Coleman, in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Charlie Pierce, Mo Rocca, and Amy Dickinson. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

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PETER SAGAL, host: Thank you, guys. Thanks so much, Korva. In just a minute, Korva is going to unveil her radical Rhyme-Rhyme-Rhyme plan.

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SAGAL: In the Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. But right, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Charlie, a company called Paulee Clean Tec has developed a new device that will get rid of your dog poop for you, or your dog's poop for it. How?

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CHARLIE PIERCE: I happen to know the answer.

SAGAL: What is it?

PIERCE: It will burn it for you. It will cremate it.

SAGAL: It does, it cremates it.

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SAGAL: The device is called the Ashpoopie.

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PIERCE: I didn't know that.

SAGAL: Now you do.

PIERCE: Okay.

SAGAL: What you do is this thing scoops up the droppings and then incinerates them, so you're left with little piles of ash you release to the winds and they blow back in your face.

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MO ROCCA: Maybe that's what the underwear bomber was doing.

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SAGAL: Some people are sentimental. They take the ashes down to the seashore. Oh, poop always liked coming here.

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SAGAL: Mo, back to the GOP debate for a minute. There were many questions left unanswered Tuesday night, but perhaps the biggest mystery involved Ron Paul. The Texas congressman seemed to be losing his what?

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ROCCA: His teeth?

SAGAL: No.

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PIERCE: His teeth.

SAGAL: You're close.

ROCCA: I didn't watch, so I'm going to have to...

SAGAL: You're a little low.

ROCCA: Okay. Oh, I'm a little low. He seemed to be losing his nose.

SAGAL: A little higher.

ROCCA: He seemed - I'm going higher now.

SAGAL: Higher than the nose.

ROCCA: Higher than the nose. He seems to be losing his hair.

SAGAL: Lower than the hair.

ROCCA: Okay. He seems to be losing eyebrows.

SAGAL: Yes.

ROCCA: Oh, eyebrows.

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SAGAL: Very good.

AMY DICKINSON: What?

SAGAL: Now, Mr. Paul is a handsome man at the age of 76. He's got a full head of hair. He's got handsome bushy eyebrows, one of which seemed to be making a break for his right cheek during the debate.

DICKINSON: No.

ROCCA: Oh my gosh.

DICKINSON: No.

SAGAL: It's really weird. It's as if he had frowned so much at talk of the Federal Reserve that the momentum of the frowning snapped off the right eyebrow.

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SAGAL: And sent it hurtling downwards.

ROCCA: Wow.

DICKINSON: No.

SAGAL: So observers, seeing this on TV, suspected artificial enhancement, you know. People approached the campaign; they said was that a fake eyebrow? What was going on? And the spokesman responded very angrily to this and said it was just his allergies. High pollen, you know.

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SAGAL: Because we've all been there. The pollen count gets high, your nose starts to run, your eyebrow falls off.

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ROCCA: Libertarians don't allow the rest of their body to tell their eyebrows how to act.

SAGAL: Exactly.

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SAGAL: It's free to do what it wants, constitutionally...

ROCCA: Exactly. Because the federal...

PIERCE: Because sooner or later the invisible hand of the marketplace will move it back to where it's supposed to be.

SAGAL: Right.

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SAGAL: Amy, a 54-year-old married woman showed up in a Washington, D.C. area emergency room. She complained of complete amnesia. Her memory of the prior day had been wiped clean. As best as doctors could guess, the cause seemed to be what?

DICKINSON: Wow. Did she just forget the previous day?

SAGAL: Yeah, about the previous day.

DICKINSON: Oh well that happens to me every - like that's just called Tuesday.

SAGAL: Yeah.

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DICKINSON: Yeah, but this happened to her.

SAGAL: Yes.

DICKINSON: Okay. Did she cheat on her husband?

SAGAL: No, as a matter of fact, quite the opposite.

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DICKINSON: She made sweet love to her spouse.

SAGAL: Yes. Apparently her amnesia was brought on by, quote, "mind-blowing sex."

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ROCCA: Wow.

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SAGAL: And it blew her mind right out.

DICKINSON: So that can really happen?

SAGAL: Apparently. She says the last thing she can remember...

DICKINSON: I've been doing it wrong.

SAGAL: Apparently.

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SAGAL: It's like what they say about the 60s, if you can remember it, then you weren't there.

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SAGAL: She says the last thing she could remember was getting all romantic with her husband. And apparently he was so passionate and skilled, he erased her memory.

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ROCCA: Wow, cool.

SAGAL: Of course, this is not allowing for the possibility that she just slipped and fell and hit her head. And when she came to and said what happened, her husband said, well darling, I'm amazed you don't remember.

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SAGAL: She told doctors, she's like, I'm not sure what happened, the last thing I remember my husband and I were sitting outside in adjacent bathtubs and then...

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SAGAL: Then there was something about him throwing a football through a tire swing. And everything went black.

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