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The Devil Makes Three On 'World Cafe: Next'
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The Devil Makes Three On 'World Cafe: Next'

The Devil Makes Three On 'World Cafe: Next'

The Devil Makes Three On 'World Cafe: Next'
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Playlist

  • "Tow"
  • "They Call That Religion"
The Devil Makes Three. i

The Devil Makes Three.

Max Blau hide caption

toggle caption Max Blau
The Devil Makes Three.

The Devil Makes Three.

Max Blau

While The Devil Makes Three's resonator guitars and herky-jerky gait invite ragtime, country and folk classifications, the enveloping darkness in songs like "Tow" elicits a deeper, early-20th-century backwater vibe. This is true American roots music, combining powerful rhythms with ornate fingerpicking, Dylan-esque storytelling and lyrical scenery.

The band's latest release, Stomp and Smash: Live at the Mystic Theatre, captures the trio at its best: genre-defying, inscrutably alluring and devoid of the need for a drummer to keep time. Frontman Pete Bernhard sings like a crusty Reconstruction-era Civil War vet, tortured by memories from long ago. Hear it for yourself on this installment of World Cafe: Next.

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