Followers Go Bananas Over Keisuke Yamada's Art

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A young Japanese artist has developed quite a web following for his banana art. Keisuke Yamada uses a toothpick and spoon to sculpt faces onto the fruit.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

A young Japanese artist has developed quite a Web following for his banana art. Keisuke Yamada uses a toothpick and spoon to sculpt faces onto the fruit. He's created a chariot-drawn Poseidon with horses leaping out of peels, plus slightly slimy likenesses of Homer Simpson and Marge with a banana beehive. Carving the sculptures is a race against time. Yamada has about 30 minutes before the fruit turns brown. It's MORNING EDITION.

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