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Limericls

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Limericls

Limericls

Limericls

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Carl reads three news-related limericks: When connectivity goes too far; a PSA for headbangers; and everyone's an expert.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank, but first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

FRANK ELLIOTT: Hi, I'm Frank Elliott(ph) from Richland, Washington.

SAGAL: Now where's Richland?

ELLIOTT: It's sort of southeastern Washington. The part of the state that's not green at all.

SAGAL: Not green. What color is it?

ELLIOTT: Sort of tan.

SAGAL: It's a tan?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ELLIOTT: Yeah, we have tumbleweeds.

SAGAL: You have tumbleweeds?

MO ROCCA: I love tumbleweeds.

ELLIOTT: Oh yeah.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Do they actually tumble like they do in the movies?

ELLIOTT: Oh yeah, yeah, people hit them with their cars and drag them underneath it and they can catch fire. They're dangerous.

SAGAL: Sounds like fun.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Frank, welcome to the show. Carl Kasell will now read you three limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each. They all have to do this time with the science of media, studies about media, media studies. If you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly on two of the limericks, you'll be a winner. Ready to go?

ELLIOTT: Yes.

SAGAL: Here is your first limerick.

CARL KASELL, HOST:

When I'm in our bed here with Deb, and our passion is starting to ebb, I'll turn on my browser to get back that wowsa. I'll simply start surfing the?

ELLIOTT: Web.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A survey from the firm PC Tools found that near a quarter of Americans maintain connectivity to the internet during sex. We have to accept our partners will be distracted in this day and age, so we put up with it, I guess. It does hurt when they start creating a profile on eHarmony right in the middle though.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here is your next limerick.

KASELL: When guitarists are starting to shred, I should be confined to my bed. But for heavy metal, I'd be in fine fettle. It's bad to be banging my?

ELLIOTT: Head.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It's our first music story today.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: It turns out it's not death metal, it's repetitive stress injury metal.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Scientists have calculated, they calculated this. The precise neck angle and rhythm most harmful for headbangers. It's 75 degrees at more than 130 beats per minute. That's the threshold. Their advice? This is a quote from the study. "Headbangers should decrease their range of head and neck motion. Headbang to slower tempo songs. Only headbang to every second beat or use personal protective equipment," unquote.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So have fun at the AC/DC concert, honey, and don't forget your music helmet.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here is your last limerick.

KASELL: The police should have got all the grime clean. There's no prints to be found when it's slime green. We jurors all know from our TV shows just what can be found at a?

ELLIOTT: Scene?

SAGAL: Yes, what kind of scene?

ELLIOTT: Crime scene.

SAGAL: Crime scene. Yes, there you go.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Prosecutors across the country are complaining that thanks to TV dramas like "CSI," suddenly every juror who can work a remote is an expert in forensic science. Sure, you've got fingerprints off of that cigarette butt, but did you test the saliva residue for DNA?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Experts say the trend is only going to get worse. In a recent poll, jurors also complained that the trial lasted more than an hour.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And that they were unable to switch to the game during the boring parts.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did Frank do on our quiz?

KASELL: Well, Frank was perfect, Peter, three correct answers. Frank, you win our prize.

SAGAL: Well done. Congratulations.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Wow.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

ELLIOTT: Thank you.

SAGAL: Thank you so much for playing, Frank.

ELLIOTT: Thank you.

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