Newspaper Association Banks On Smart Being Sexy

"Smart is sexy" is the tagline for a new ad campaign the Newspaper Association of America just rolled out. The Internet has stolen readers and advertising dollars from newspapers, which are still trying to find a way to be profitable. Visits to newspaper websites are up over the past year, but the association wants to seduce more readers.

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ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Newspapers don't want you to think of them as dying. They would rather you think of them as sexy. The Newspaper Association of America just rolled out a new ad campaign with the tagline: Smart is sexy. And that's our last word in business today. The Internet has stolen readers and advertising dollars from newspapers, but the papers are still trying to find a way to be profitable. Visits to newspaper websites are actually up over the last year, the association says. Still, they want to seduce more readers. So their ads argue: Be able to find Iran on a map. Know what city council is up to, because a little depth looks great on you. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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