Russia Encounters Glitch In Daylight Savings Switch

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President Dmitri Medvedev declared that his country would not "fall back" this year, saying he wanted to save Russians the stress of turning back their clocks an hour. But smartphones and computers didn't get the memo. People missed meetings and trains when gadgets made the switch, according to the Moscow Times.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Russia's president declared that his country would not fall back this year. Dmitri Medvedev said he wanted to save Russians the stress of turning back their clocks an hour. But smartphones and computers didn't get the memo. People missed meetings when gadgets made the switch, according to the Moscow Times. International traders have adjusted to the new work hours, at least until this weekend when other countries turn their clocks back. It's MORNING EDITION.

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