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Popular YouTube Videos Are Cash Cows For Uploaders

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Popular YouTube Videos Are Cash Cows For Uploaders

Business

Popular YouTube Videos Are Cash Cows For Uploaders

Popular YouTube Videos Are Cash Cows For Uploaders

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142295632/142295623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Several years ago a man uploaded a clip of his son getting his finger chomped on by his baby brother. The upload became a YouTube sensation. Britain's Daily Telegraph reports that dad has made more than $150,000 from that video. YouTube makes deals with people whose videos could become hits, and offers them some of the revenues from ads it places on the video's page.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now let's see if you're manly enough to take the pain to make the money that we'll talk about in our last word in business. A few years ago a man uploaded a clip of his son getting his finger bitten by the baby brother.

(SOUNDBITE OF SCREAM)

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: (Unintelligible)

INSKEEP: Now, maybe you saw this, because the upload became a YouTube sensation. It's been seen almost 400 million times. And now Britain's Daily Telegraph reports that the dad of those kids has made more than $150,000 from that video. YouTube makes deals with people who upload popular videos or videos that could become hits and YouTube offers them some of the revenues from ads it places on the video's page. Apparently, hundreds of families have made six figures sums this way. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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