Occupy America: The Commemorative Game

What began in the fall of 2011 as the amorphous Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City morphed into Occupy America, a nationwide diorama drama containing many elements of a board game — positive steps, punishing losses of turn and, in some cities such as Hartford, Conn., occasional free parking.

The movement against greed, war, waste, discrimination — and sundry other things — has had light moments, such as the election of Shelby the Dog as leader of Occupy Denver. And dark moments: reports of pepper spraying, sexual assaults, deaths and general chaos in or near some encampments.

What will the Occupy movement ultimately mean? No one is quite sure. Dot-orgs such as Move On and Occupy Wall Street hope to harness the fervor and fury of disillusioned Occupiers. Putting the chant in disenchantment — "We are the 99 percent!" — this was, after all, the not-so-silent majority.

Regardless of the outcome, the protests have often resembled Life. And Risk. And Candyland and other games. Anti-Monopoly in living color and 3-D, perhaps.

The Occupy movement has provided satisfactions, frustrations and successes. Just like a game.

Occupy America: The Commemorative Game

To play, roll the die; you'll move the correct number of spaces. With each roll, you'll have a chance to pitch a tent in a new city. Click on the entry to read about the news event in each locale. Try to pitch as many tents — and therefore Occupy as many cities — as possible as you cross the country.

[Interactive:Occupy America: The Commemorative Game]

This graphic requires version 10 or higher of the Adobe Flash Player.Get the latest Flash Player.

This interactive content is not supported by this device.

Occupy America

If the game does not appear above, please try viewing it at http://n.pr/v2pVRv with a Flash-enabled computer or device.

Related NPR Stories

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: