NPR logo

Nissan Displays Redesigned Food Truck At LA Show

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142494968/142494949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Nissan Displays Redesigned Food Truck At LA Show

Business

Nissan Displays Redesigned Food Truck At LA Show

Nissan Displays Redesigned Food Truck At LA Show

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142494968/142494949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new truck is specially designed for mobile restaurateurs. The Nissan NV is smaller than the standard food truck, so it can fit into smaller roadside spaces. It has chrome bumpers, and built-in bluetooth technology.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's consider now, those vehicles that offer something really cheap - the food trucks that have become so popular. At the L.A. Auto Show, Nissan has on display a new truck specially designed for mobile restaurateurs. Our last word in business today is: culinary concept car.

The new Nissan NV is smaller than the standard food truck, so it can fit into smaller roadside spaces. It has chrome bumpers, and built-in Bluetooth technology. The design is also a departure from the old souped-up, second-hand mail truck look. One food truck owner described it as cool and futuristic. But perhaps best of all, she told the Los Angeles Times, having a major carmaker behind this, quote, brings a legitimacy to the food truck industry that we're starving for.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.