Italy's Parliament Bans 'Personal Images' Of Itself

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/142749431/142749087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

Facing a financial crisis that threatens Europe, Italy's lower house of parliament got down to important business. They passed a rule to save themselves from themselves. Photographers use long lenses to capture lawmakers making rude gestures, passing notes — or voting for absent colleagues, a practice that has been called "playing the piano," as they press several buttons at once. So, lawmakers have banned photographers from taking "personal images."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Facing a financial crisis that threatens Europe, Italy's lower house of parliament got down to important business. They passed a rule to save themselves from themselves. Photographers use long lenses to capture lawmakers making rude gestures, passing notes or voting for absent colleagues. That's called playing the piano, since you press several buttons at once. Now lawmakers have banned photographers from taking what they describe as, quote, "personal images." It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.