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Daimler To End MayBach Brand In 2013

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Daimler To End MayBach Brand In 2013

Business

Daimler To End MayBach Brand In 2013

Daimler To End MayBach Brand In 2013

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The historic brand is made for customers who can shell out $400,000 for a car, and who appreciate touches like back seats that recline, laser-engraved motifs in the armrest and black lacquer trim. Daimler only sold about 200 of the cars last year, compared to several thousand by competitors Bentley and Rolls Royce.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is lost luxury. Maybach cars are in a rarified niche market called ultra-luxury, for those for whom luxury is not enough. Maybach, the historic brand now owned by Daimler, is made for customers who can pay $400,000 for a car, and who appreciate touches like back seats that recline - back seats, that is - laser-engraved motifs in the armrest and black lacquer trim. Rappers like Kanye and Jay-Z have immortalized the car in their rhymes.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CHANGE CLOTHES")

JAY-Z: (Rapping) Your dude is back, Maybach Coupe is back. Tell the whole world the truth is back.

INSKEEP: Maybe the Coupe is back, but not for long. Daimler only sold about 200 of these cars last year, compared to thousands by competitors like Bentley and Rolls Royce. And yesterday, the company said it will stop making Maybach cars in 2013. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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