Weekly Standard: Obama Election Strategy Stumbles

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President Barack Obama smiles as he speaks to students of Campbell High School on his visit to Australia, on Nov. 17, 2011 in Canberra, Australia. i

President Barack Obama smiles as he speaks to students of Campbell High School on his visit to Australia, on Nov. 17, 2011 in Canberra, Australia. Lukas Coch-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Lukas Coch-Pool/Getty Images
President Barack Obama smiles as he speaks to students of Campbell High School on his visit to Australia, on Nov. 17, 2011 in Canberra, Australia.

President Barack Obama smiles as he speaks to students of Campbell High School on his visit to Australia, on Nov. 17, 2011 in Canberra, Australia.

Lukas Coch-Pool/Getty Images

Across a series of news articles (e.g., this story by Jackie Calmes and Mark Landler and this one by Jim Rutenberg), blog posts (e.g., this piece by Thomas Edsall and this one by Josh Kraushaar), and analyses (e.g., this paper by Ruy Teixeira and Joel Rogers), it has become clear how Team Obama sees a path to reelection.

Essentially, it all comes down to three big goals:

1. Do as well with the non-white vote as Obama did in 2008, with the expectation that it continues to increase as a share of the total electorate.

2. Hold steady with upscale white voters, who tend to be more focused on quality of life issues like environmentalism.

3. Mitigate losses among the white working class, but expect to lose this group once again.

So this would be a path to 270 electoral votes that might include Colorado, Nevada, and Virginia (which historically have been Republican) but not Ohio (a quadrennial swing state) or even Pennsylvania (which historically has been Democratic).

Is this a feasible approach?

At this point, it's not likely. I could go on at length about all of its problems, but let's just look at the three biggest dilemmas I see.

1. Obama still needs the "white working class." Josh Kraushaar made a good point earlier this month when he discussed the Obama administration's decision on the Keystone XL Pipeline:

The administration's decision to cater to environmentalists by postponing construction of the Keystone XL pipeline is a clear sign of the dilemma. The president decided to punt on a job stimulus measure in order to placate parts of the coalition that elected him in 2008. Environmental sensitivities took precedence over job creation.

The problem with this approach is that the white working class is more essential to the Obama coalition than one might think. To appreciate this, consider the following chart, which identifies the percent of Obama's voting coalition that was white working class (defined here as whites without a college degree) in the Midwestern swing states.

Continue reading at The Weekly Standard.

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