Campaign To Women Voters: Board The 'Cain Train'

Melissa Block and Guy Raz talk about a new campaign that the Herman Cain team launched Friday, called "Women for Herman Cain."

Copyright © 2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

At a press conference today in South Carolina, Herman Cain said that he would clarify.

That word again, clarify, exactly what the next steps are.

He didn't release any details, only that he would make an announcement tomorrow in Atlanta.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Which leads us to another announcement from the Cain team - the launch of a new campaign for a certain group that's waned in its support, namely women.

RAZ: The Women for Herman Cain campaign is chaired by Cain's wife, Gloria. The launch comes at a time when Cain faces accusation that he's sexually harassed female employees while CEO of the National Restaurant Association, and claims of a 13-year affair with a woman from Atlanta.

BLOCK: Alveda King, niece of Martin Luther King, Jr., is leading the Women for Herman Cain initiative. She denies that the timing of the website has anything to do with the recent allegations.

DR. ALVEDA KING: I think it's appropriate that the country would know that there are women who support Mr. Herman Cain.

RAZ: According to the Women for Herman Cain webpage, quote, "Mr. Cain has been a strong advocate for women throughout his lifetime." And it features statements from female Cain supporters, including this one from Adele McLachlan(ph) of Mesa, Arizona.

ADELE MCLACHLAN: I know it must be so difficult on you and your family and I'm sorry for that. But sometimes we have we all have to take a stand in order to help the next generation. I'm standing beside you, Mr. Cain, and I will not get off the Cain train until they throw me off. Sincerely, Adele MacLachlan.

BLOCK: We'll learn tomorrow whether it Cain train has reached its final destination.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.