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Opening Panel Round

Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Rick Perry's trouble with numbers.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it's time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Luke, remember Rick Perry? He is still running for president.

LUKE BURBANK: That name sounds really familiar.

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

MO ROCCA TELEVISION PERSONALITY: He was on "General Hospital," right?

BURBANK: Oh yeah.

SAGAL: I think so, yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: Yes.

SAGAL: Anyway, he was in New Hampshire this week, and he asked young people of voting age to support him on Election Day. But he managed to make a little error. What did he get wrong?

BURBANK: I think he actually made two errors, in fact. One was that he thought the voting age there was 21, which I don't think it is anywhere, right?

SAGAL: Right.

BURBANK: And he also had the wrong day for the vote.

SAGAL: That's exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: He got both the voting age and the date of the election wrong. Governor Perry said to a group of college students; quote, "Those of you that will be 21 by November 12th, I ask for your support and your vote," unquote. The voting age in the United States is 18, not 21, has been for a while. And Election Day next year is November 6th. So he asserted two facts in one brief sentence, and he got both wrong.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: You know, technically speaking though, he wasn't totally wrong. You could be 21 on November 12th and you could vote November 6th.

PERSONALITY: Yeah.

SAGAL: That's true.

BURBANK: For Rick Perry.

PERSONALITY: Absolutely.

SAGAL: Or he mentioned 21 because that's the drinking age and he knows that to vote for him you have to be smashed.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: This is true. People who knew him or know him back in Texas are kind of amazed by how badly he's doing. Even for him, this is really terrible.

There's one theory that is popular in Austin. It was published in "Vanity Fair." That people know that he had back surgery and they're afraid that's messed him up. The discomfort in his back, maybe the painkillers he's taking, has put him off his game. In related news, Governor Perry's brain is located in his lower back.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

PERSONALITY: I think it's the hair again. If he and Mitt Romney mussed each other's hair up, they'd both be doing better.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You think so?

PERSONALITY: They should let Ron Paul comb their hair.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: That sounds like the worst slumber party ever.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BURBANK: We made pizza rolls. We talked about boys. And Ron Paul combed our hair.

PERSONALITY: Ron Paul combed our hair.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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