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After Katrina, A Log Cabin In An Unlikely Place

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After Katrina, A Log Cabin In An Unlikely Place

Around the Nation

After Katrina, A Log Cabin In An Unlikely Place

After Katrina, A Log Cabin In An Unlikely Place

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Gerald Brady, a former shipyard welder, built this log cabin on eight-foot-high concrete piers. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Richard Gonzales/NPR

Gerald Brady, a former shipyard welder, built this log cabin on eight-foot-high concrete piers.

Richard Gonzales/NPR

Gerald Brady's neighborhood in Arabi, La., was devastated by Katrina. It's still mostly empty lots and the few homes around are made of brick.

Brady's house — a log cabin built on eight-foot-high concrete piers — stands out so much that tourists come around to take pictures. He fought hard to build the unlikely house of his dreams in a most unusual place.

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