Logical Next Step: Fake Luxury-Brand Shopping Bags

China is known for making knock-offs, especially fake luxury goods. Counterfeiting in that country apparently has reached a new level. Chinese shoppers, according to China Daily, are now buying fake luxury-brand shopping bags — the paper bags that make people think you've been buying things in the real Louis Vuitton or Chanel store.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

China is known for making knock-offs, especially fake luxury goods, and counterfeiting in that country has reached a new level. That's our last word in business today. It's in the bag - just not a fancy handbag. The Chinese Daily newspaper reports that Chinese shoppers are now buying fake luxury-brand shopping bags - you know, the paper bags that make people think you've been buying things in the real Louis Vuitton or Chanel store.

The branded shopping bags can be purchased from websites and cost less than a dollar apiece. One office worker who buys the faux bags told the China Daily that she likes to use them for giving presents to friends who may or may not be disappointed when they open the actual gift.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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