Patty Duke Applies For Social Security Benefits

Actress Patty Duke celebrated her 65th birthday Wednesday by apply for Social Security benefits. She did so online, as she's encouraged other seniors to do for years.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And financial-aid applications can be filled out online by students and their families. For older Americans, the government offers online applications for Social Security benefits.

And for the last few years, actress Patty Duke has been urging seniors to log on.

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PATTY DUKE: Filing for Social Security online is a lot easier than me learning the Watusi.

MONTAGNE: It's been nearly 50 years since Patty Duke won an Oscar for her role as Helen Keller in "The Miracle Worker." Yesterday, she turned 65 years old and had a chance to take the advice she's been giving to others in ads like that Watusi video.

In the latest video from the Social Security Administration, she's shown applying for her benefits on a laptop computer in red, flannel pajamas.

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DUKE: I've known my Social Security number since I was 7 years old. That's 58 years, and they're finally paying off.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: So Patty Duke describes the application process as emotional and triumphant. She also jokes she was finally able to correctly say Social Security, after having her teeth fixed.

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