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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

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Our panelists predict who will be Time Magazine's Person of the Year in 2012.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, Panel, who will be Time's Person of the Year in 2012? Paula Poundstone?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: I think it's going to be Pat from Sheboygan because if all goes right, she's going to give us health and wealth.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Jessi Klein?

JESSI KLEIN: I think - work with me on this one - I think the person of the year is going to be badass actress Meryl Streep because 2012 is the year the world is supposed to end, and I have a theory that even if Meryl herself does not know how to save us, she will find a way to play someone who does, and will win an Oscar for it.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: And Maz Jobrani?

MAZ JOBRANI: This year it was the protestor and next year it's going to be the banker because he will just buy Time magazine and name himself the person of the year.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: That's how it's done.

CARL KASELL, HOST:

Well, if any of those people are named Person of the Year, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!.

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell. Thanks also to Paula Poundstone, Jessi Klein, Maz Jobrani.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal. We'll see you next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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