The Next Hit Film Might Be On The 'Black List'

Movie executive Franklin Leonard's "Black List" came out last week, and it's a collection on which a lot of filmmakers would like to find their projects. Host Audie Cornish takes a quick look at the coveted list.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Movie executive Franklin Leonard's "Black List" came out last week, and it's a collection on which a lot of filmmakers would like to find their projects. Since 2005, Mr. Leonard has compiled his favorite unproduced screenplays. Some, like "Juno," "Slumdog Millionaire" and "The King's Speech," have caught the attention of studios and gone on to become major hits. This year, some 71 scripts selected as faves by producers have made the lists. Among them, there is, of course, a flesh-eating zombie flick called "Maggie"; a look at what might have happened to the Apollo 11 mission had it crashed on the moon; another historical redo - it's called "The Knoll." In this one, a rookie cop and his potential girlfriend witness the JFK assassination and are on the run from the murderers. And then there's "Chewie." That's a fictionalized look behind the scenes at the making of "Star Wars" through the eyes of Peter Mayhew, the seven-foot-three-inch actor who played Chewbacca.

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