NPR logo

'Opossum' by Brother/Sister

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/143936333/143860582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Brother/Sister: Longing For Summer

Brother/Sister: Longing For Summer

'Opossum' by Brother/Sister

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/143936333/143860582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

With its uniquely West Coast sound, Brother/Sister captures a sense of youthful uncertainty and hope in "Opossum." Tracy Antonopoulos hide caption

toggle caption Tracy Antonopoulos

With its uniquely West Coast sound, Brother/Sister captures a sense of youthful uncertainty and hope in "Opossum."

Tracy Antonopoulos

Monday's Pick

Song: "Opossum"

Artist: Brother/Sister

CD: The Accidental Zoo EP

Genre: Pop-Rock

Theo and Sasha Spielberg perform together as Brother/Sister — they are brother and sister, via adoption — and "Opossum" is perfectly engineered to make listeners long for summer. Growing up in L.A. (yes, they share a famous father), the two have been playing music since they were toddlers but, due to space and time conflicts, only recently started devoting themselves to Brother/Sister as more than a side project.

Together, they share a uniquely West Coast sound, described by Theo Spielberg as "the music that would be made by two people who grew up sharing a wall." In addition to writing and arranging all the music, he also plays all the instruments: In "Opossum," that means guitar, drums, bass, piano, marxophone and assorted percussion.

Written during their waning days at Ivy League schools, "Opossum" has a way of reflecting the pair's youthful uncertainty and hope. For her part, Sasha Spielberg handles all the words, which infuse the song with feelings of restlessness; with the idea that you can't just play dead anymore. Her voice sounds uplifting and dynamic, and it's on full display in "Opossum," as she begins in a gentle croon but winds up exuding power and soul. The result, in every way, sounds like a fruitful new beginning.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.